HOW GREAT THOU ART

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting "Bold is the ship bound for Alpha Centauri, nothing can turn it around..." Since Star Trek has not yet become a reality, we must ride the bold spaceship of our imagination and view the wonders of the universe through pictures taken by telescopes. Thanks to Hubble and others, we can emulate Captain Picard and say, "Let's see what's out there." Glories and Wonders! How great Thou art!
  • Mad is the Captain of Alpha Centauri; We must be out of our minds. Still we are shipmates bound for tomorrow, and everyone here's flying blind. Mad is the crew bound for Alpha Centauri, Dreamers and poets and clowns. Bold is the crew bound for Alpha Centauri; nothing can turn it around. Oh, we must believe in magic; we must believe in the guiding hand. If you believe in magic, you'll have the universe at your command. Artist:Crystal Gayle; album UNKNOWN @LyricsandSongs.com
  • Sunday, October 25, 2009

     

    Earthlike Planet Found-May Have Liquid Water



    A distant world known as Gliese 581e (foreground in this artist's conception) is the lightest planet outside our solar system found to date, astronomers announced in April 2009. The planet, one of four orbiting a red dwarf star, is just less than twice the mass of Earth.

    Astronomers also announced that one of the system's other planets, Gliese 581d, is an Earthlike world that orbits in the right zone to host liquid water, and thus potentially life.

    Image courtesy ESO/L. Calçada




    earthlike planet - liquid water

    http://news.nationalgeographic.co.uk/news/2009/04/090421-most-earthlike-planet.html?sms_ss=email

    Most Earthlike Planet Yet Found May Have Liquid Oceans

    Kate Ravilious
    for National Geographic News
    April 21, 2009

    It probably wouldn't feel exactly like home. But the planet known as Gliese 581d has a lot more in common with Earth than astronomers first thought.

    New measurements of the planet's orbit place it firmly in a region where conditions would be right for liquid water, and thus life as we know it, astronomer Michel Mayor, from Geneva University in Switzerland, announced today.

    "It lies in the [life-supporting] habitable zone, and it could have an ocean at its surface," Mayor said during the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science conference, being held this week at the University of Hertfordshire in the U.K.

    First discovered in 2007, Gliese 581d was originally calculated to be too far away from its host star—and therefore too cold—to support an ocean.

    But Mayor and colleagues now show that the extrasolar planet, or exoplanet, orbits its host in 66.8 days, putting it just inside the cool star's habitable zone.

    At the same time, Mayor and colleagues announced that they have spotted a fourth planet orbiting in the Gliese 581 star system—and it's the lightest exoplanet found so far.

    The planet, dubbed Gliese 581e, is only about twice the mass of Earth and is the closest planet to the star, completing its orbit in about 3.15 days.

    "It brings down the mass [of the lightest known exoplanet] by more than a factor of two. The previous smallest was around five Earth masses," said Andrew Collier Cameron, an astronomer at the University of Saint Andrews in the U.K. who was not involved in the find.

    (Related: "Mysterious 'Super Earth' Is Smallest Known Exoplanet?")

    Near Neighbor

    Gliese 581, a red dwarf star in the constellation Libra, lies around 20.5 light-years from Earth.

    "In astronomical terms it is one of our near neighbors, the 87th closest known star system to the sun," said Carole Haswell, an astronomer at the Open University in Milton Keynes, U.K.

    Since planets orbiting Gliese 581 are too far away to be seen directly, Mayor and colleagues originally spotted Gliese 581d by searching for tiny wobbles in the host star's motion using the European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescope at La Silla in Chile.

    Weighing in at around seven Earth masses, Gliese 581d is unlikely to be made of rocks alone, the team believes.

    "We can only speculate at this stage, but it may have a rocky core, encased in an icy layer, with a liquid ocean at the surface and an atmosphere," Mayor said.

    Meanwhile, the much smaller and lighter Gliese 581e "probably doesn't look too different to Earth, except that it will be very hot, because it is so close to its host star," said Andrew Norton, an astronomer also at the Open University.

    Norton's colleague Haswell added: "It is very exciting that such a promising candidate for an Earthlike planet has been found so close to us. It means there are likely to be many more when we search further."

    And the more Earthlike planets there are, the greater the chance of discovering one that harbors life.

    "I think it is only a matter of time," Norton said. "If life really does exist elsewhere in the universe, then within the next 10 to 15 years I expect we may see the first signs of life, via spectroscopic signals from exoplanets."



    Labels:


    Comments: Post a Comment

    Links to this post:

    Create a Link



    << Home

    Archives

    June 2006   July 2006   September 2006   November 2006   December 2006   January 2007   February 2007   March 2007   April 2007   May 2007   June 2007   July 2007   November 2007   December 2007   January 2008   February 2008   March 2008   April 2008   May 2008   June 2008   July 2008   September 2008   October 2008   November 2008   December 2008   January 2009   February 2009   March 2009   April 2009   July 2009   August 2009   September 2009   October 2009   November 2009   December 2009  

    This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?